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Child Support 101

Child Support 101

Category: Divorce , Family Law

Child Support

Introduction

Child support is a payment made by a parent to the other. It’s generally calculated based on the income of each individual and how much time each parent has with the child. The amount of child support can vary widely depending on several factors discussed below.

State laws vary, but generally, child support is calculated based on each parent’s income and the amount of time each parent spends with the child.

Generally, child support is calculated based on each parent’s income and the amount of time each parent spends with the child. The needs of the child are also considered. In some states, if both parents live in separate households, they may be required to contribute to a college fund for their children.

If a judge determines that child support should be paid, both parents will be legally required to fulfill their obligation.

If a judge determines that child support should be paid, both parents will be legally required to fulfill their obligation. Child support is not optional and it’s not voluntary. If you’re ordered to pay child support, you must pay it each month or face legal consequences for failure to do so.

If a parent fails to pay court-ordered child support on time, this can result in penalties such as wage garnishments or suspension of driver’s licenses and professional licenses (like those needed by doctors).

Court orders may be modified as long as the modification is in the best interest of the child.

Courts can modify orders if there has been a change in circumstances. This means that the court could:

  • Change how much child support a parent pays or receives, if they were paying too much or receiving too little;
  • Order either or both parents to pay for medical and dental insurance for their children; and/or
  • Make other changes that are in the best interest of the child(ren).

The court may order either or both parents to pay for medical or dental insurance for a child

The court may order either or both parents to pay for medical or dental insurance for a child. This is not child support. It’s an insurance premium and should be paid by the parent who has custody of your daughter because it’s for her benefit, not yours or mine. You’re required by law to pay this premium on behalf of your daughter because she’s too young to do so herself (she can’t apply for medical coverage until she turns 18). So if you want her to have health insurance when she grows up, you’ll need to start paying this now.

The court will determine how much financial support must be paid. This amount is called the “basic support obligation.”

The court will determine how much financial support must be paid. This amount is called the “basic support obligation.” The basic support obligation is based on the income of the noncustodial parent, and it is determined by applying a percentage to that income. The court will also take into consideration other factors like any special needs of your children and their ages when determining how much basic support you should receive each month.

The basic support obligation does not include any additional expenses for things like clothes or entertainment (although some courts may allow these items to be included as part of child support).

Ordinarily, a parent who has physical custody of a child receives a higher level of support than a noncustodial parent.

In most cases, the amount of child support is determined by statutory guidelines that are based on a number of factors. These factors include:

  • The amount of time each parent spends with the child.
  • The income of each parent and their ability to pay for their own needs, as well as support for the child’s needs.
  • The standard of living enjoyed by both parents during the marriage.

In addition to the basic support obligation, courts may award extra amounts to pay for extraordinary expenses such as health care or educational needs.

In addition to the basic support obligation, courts may award extra amounts to pay for extraordinary expenses such as health care or educational needs. You can request that the court order your child’s other parent to pay these kinds of expenses if you show that they are “extraordinary” and reasonable. Extraordinary medical costs might include payments for eyeglasses and prescription drugs, while extraordinary educational costs might be tuition at a private school or private tutoring. The law allows courts to order parents who are not living with their children (custodial parents) to pay for “necessary” day care expenses if it is in the best interests of the child.

Child support can be determined by many different factors

Child support is determined by many different factors. The most important of these are the number of children, each parent’s income, and time each parent spends with their child(ren).

When calculating child support, you’ll need to know how many children there are in total. This includes any stepchildren or adopted children as well. You’ll also need to know how much money each parent makes on a yearly basis. If one or both parents have other sources of income (like investments), those can be added into the mix too! Finally—and this will likely be the most difficult part—you’ll need to decide who gets custody of your children: you or your ex-spouse?

Once all this information is gathered, we can calculate what amount should be paid per month toward paying for their basic needs such as food and shelter as well as other necessities like clothes and toys!

Conclusion

The court will determine how much financial support must be paid. This amount is called the “basic support obligation.” The court may order either or both parents to pay for medical or dental insurance for a child. In addition to the basic support obligation, courts may award extra amounts to pay for extraordinary expenses such as health care or educational needs.

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